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KimoYES Glossary
Kimono
Kimono
traditional full-length Japanese garment
Furisode
a type of kimono by unmarried women, typically worn at formal occasions. The sleeves are longer than in other kimono
Hitoe
a type of un-lined kimono
Homongi
a type of semi-formal kimono, less formal than the furisode. The pattern of a homongi flows continuously across the seams of the different panels
Juban
a robe worn under the kimono to keep the kimono clean and protect it from wear
Komon
a stencil-dyed kimono, patterned all over
Tomesode
the most formal kimono, typically black, worn by married women on special occasions. On tomesode kimono, the pattern is around the hem and below the waist line
Tsukesage
a type of Kimono that is less formal than homongi and which is tailored to make the patterns on both sides go upwards to the shoulders
Uchikake
uchikake is a kimono which is the traditional bridal costume
Yukata
cotton kimono without linings worn as bathrobes or as casual clothes for the summer
Obi
Obi
a belt or sash to be worn with kimono
Chuya-Obi
a reversible obi with two different patterns inside and outside
Fukuro-Obi
fukuro obi is appropriate for formal and semiformal occasions. Fukuro means double-fold or bag. It is made of two different fabrics, which are sewn together. The pattern only appears on one side
Hakata Obi
a kind of stiff obi
Hanhaba
a kind of Obi that is half the width of other obi and is worn casually with yukata and other kimono
Heko Obi
a kind of Obi for boys or men
Maru Obi
the patterns are woven on double-width fabric before being bent and stitched. Both the outside and reverse are patterned
Nagoya Obi
the nagoya obi is characterised by a portion of the obi being pre-folded and stitched in half
Obi-age
a sash worn under an obi
Obi-jime
an obi cord
Haori
Haori
a kimono jacket, typically of hip or mid-thigh length
Himo
ties for closing the front of a haori or other garment
Michiyuki
a type of haori with a square neckline at the front
Miscellaneous
Fukusa
a piece of square cloth, frequently embroidered, used to cover or wrap gifts
Kanzashi
hair accessories including combs, pins and ornaments used in traditional Japanese hair styles
Silks
Bingata
a type of stencil dyed fabric originating from the island of Okinawa, typically featuring bright colours
Chijimi
pre-dyed fabric with fine wrinkles on its surface. The wrinkles come out with strongly twisted silk weft threads
Chirimen
silk fabric with wavy wrinkle, produced by twisting the threads while weaving
Donsu
damask silk of a thick and glossy texture
Hitokoshi-Chirimen
a kind of chirimen, crepe silk, characterized by its small and minute wrinkle
Kinsya
high quality silk-gauze woven with foil, gold and silk threads
Koubai
sheer material with lattice pattern
Meisen
silk woven with dyed cocoon in the ikat technique
Omeshi
a silk woven in the ikat technique with strongly twisted pre-dyed silk threads
Rinzu
glossy thick silk
Ro
silk gauze
Shibori
silk produced by one of several methods of dyeing the fabric with a pattern by binding, stitching, folding, twisting, or compressing it
Sha
a sheer silk fabric with a rough texture
Tsumugi
silk with a rough texture, woven with hand-spun threads from cocoon fibres
Urushi
Urushi is brocade woven with lacquered threads which may be coloured, but are most often in shades of gold, copper and silver
Cottons
Yukata
cotton (see also "Techniques" below)
Hemp
Jyofu
a hemp fabric – very thin and light
Synthetics
Jin-ken
rayon
Kasen
synthetic
Techniques
Ikat
a style of weaving that uses a resist dyeing process before the threads are woven to form a pattern or design
Kasuri
fabric woven with threads that have been pre-dyed to produce a motif – most commonly cotton, but also silk and silk mixes
Shibori
see silks above
Yuzen
design produced using a dyeing technique where each pattern is drawn or painted by hand